Audit & Assurance

We provide an unbiased look at your financial and operational situation with our Audit and Assurance services for nonprofit and privately held organizations.

Audit & Assurance Services include:

  • Audits, reviews and compilations
  • Financial statements—audits, reviews, compilations
  • Agreed upon procedures
  • Internal audits
  • Internal policies assurance
  • Retirement plan audits
  • Audit committee consulting
  • Forecasts and projections

Specialization
We offer specialized audit and assurance teams with in-depth experience in affordable housing, nonprofit organizations, financial institutions, healthcare providers and retirement plans.

Quality
We are committed to the highest standards in performing quality audits. Our commitment to quality and to the profession is illustrated by our participation as a reviewer in the American Institute of CPAs Peer Review Program.

 

We are proud to hold membership in the top industry assurance organizations:

American Institute of Certified Public Accountants

The AICPA represents the CPA profession nationally regarding rule-making and standard-setting, and serves as an advocate before legislative bodies, public interest groups and other professional organizations.

Governmental Audit Quality Center

The GAQC promotes the importance of quality governmental audits and the value of such audits to purchasers of governmental audit services.

Center for Audit Quality

The CAQ is an autonomous public policy organization dedicated to enhancing investor confidence and public trust in the global capital markets.

Employee Benefit Plan Audit Quality Center

The EBPAQC is a voluntary membership organization for firms that perform ERISA employee benefit plan audits, established to promote the quality of employee benefit plan audits.

“Accounting is really about people and building rewarding relationships.”

— Fritz Duncan, CPA, Partner & Shareholder

Audit & Assurance Team


Fritz Duncan, CPA

Fritz Duncan, CPA

Partner and Shareholder

Bio

Sara Hummel, CPA

Sara Hummel, CPA

Director of Quality Control

Bio

Evan Dickens, CPA

Evan Dickens, CPA

Partner and Shareholder

Bio

Jon Newport, CPA

Jon Newport, CPA

Partner and Shareholder

Bio

Kari Young, CPA

Kari Young, CPA

Senior Manager

Bio

Sarah Fantazia, CPA

Sarah Fantazia, CPA

Manager

Bio

Mathew Hamlin, CPA

Mathew Hamlin, CPA

Manager

Bio


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Recent News

3 Midyear Tax Planning Strategies for Business

3 Midyear Tax Planning Strategies for Business

Tax reform has been a major topic of discussion in Washington, but it’s still unclear exactly what such legislation will include and whether it will be signed into law this year. However, the last major tax legislation that was signed into law — back in December of 2015 — still has a significant impact on tax planning for businesses. Let’s look at three midyear tax strategies inspired by the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH) Act:

1. Buy equipment. The PATH Act preserved both the generous limits for the Section 179 expensing election and the availability of bonus depreciation. These breaks generally apply to qualified fixed assets, including equipment or machinery, placed in service during the year. For 2017, the maximum Sec. 179 deduction is $510,000, subject to a $2,030,000 phaseout threshold. Without the PATH Act, the 2017 limits would have been $25,000 and $200,000, respectively. Higher limits are now permanent and subject to inflation indexing.
Additionally, for 2017, your business may be able to claim 50% bonus depreciation for qualified costs in excess of what you expense under Sec. 179. Bonus depreciation is scheduled to be reduced to 40% in 2018 and 30% in 2019 before it’s set to expire on December 31, 2019.

2. Ramp up research. After years of uncertainty, the PATH Act made the research credit permanent. For qualified research expenses, the credit is generally equal to 20% of expenses over a base amount that’s essentially determined using a historical average of research expenses as a percentage of revenues. There’s also an alternative computation for companies that haven’t increased their research expenses substantially over their historical base amounts.
In addition, a small business with $50 million or less in gross receipts may claim the credit against its alternative minimum tax (AMT) liability. And, a start-up company with less than $5 million in gross receipts may claim the credit against up to $250,000 in employer Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) taxes.

3. Hire workers from “target groups.” Your business may claim the Work Opportunity credit for hiring a worker from one of several “target groups,” such as food stamp recipients and certain veterans. The PATH Act extended the credit through 2019. It also added a new target group: long-term unemployment recipients.
Generally, the maximum Work Opportunity credit is $2,400 per worker. But it’s higher for workers from certain target groups, such as disabled veterans.
One last thing to keep in mind is that, in terms of tax breaks, “permanent” only means that there’s no scheduled expiration date. Congress could still pass legislation that changes or eliminates “permanent” breaks. But it’s unlikely any of the breaks discussed here would be eliminated or reduced for 2017. To keep up to date on tax law changes and get a jump start on your 2017 tax planning, contact us.

© 2017

Own a Vacation Home? Adjusting Rental vs. Personal Use Might Save Taxes

Own a Vacation Home? Adjusting Rental vs. Personal Use Might Save Taxes

Now that we’ve hit midsummer, if you own a vacation home that you both rent out and use personally, it’s a good time to review the potential tax consequences:

If you rent it out for less than 15 days: You don’t have to report the income. But expenses associated with the rental (such as advertising and cleaning) won’t be deductible.

If you rent it out for 15 days or more: You must report the income. But what expenses you can deduct depends on how the home is classified for tax purposes, based on the amount of personal vs. rental use:

Rental property. If you (or your immediate family) use the home for 14 days or less, or under 10% of the days you rent out the property, whichever is greater, the IRS will classify the home as a rental property. You can deduct rental expenses, including losses, subject to the real estate activity rules. You can’t deduct any interest that’s attributable to your personal use of the home, but you can take the personal portion of property tax as an itemized deduction.

Nonrental property. If you (or your immediate family) use the home for more than 14 days or 10% of the days you rent out the property, whichever is greater, the IRS will classify the home as a personal residence, but you will still have to report the rental income. You can deduct rental expenses only to the extent of your rental income. Any excess can be carried forward to offset rental income in future years. You also can take an itemized deduction for the personal portion of both mortgage interest and property tax.

Look at the use of your vacation home year-to-date to project how it will be classified for tax purposes. Adjusting the number of days you rent it out and/or use it personally between now and year end might allow the home to be classified in a more beneficial way.

For assistance, please contact us. We’d be pleased to help.

© 2017